Big and Small, These Pups Fetch High Prices

Raising a pup isn’t that different from raising a child. There’s food, schooling, and medical bills to think about. Of course, you don’t have to pay to acquire a child, which is one of the…well, one of bigger ways that kids and pups differ. The average lifetime cost of raising a dog comes to an average of around twenty-three thousand dollars.
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But if your favorite breed is on this list, you might end up paying a lot more. Whether it’s because they’re rare, have a lot of desirable traits, or a combination of the two, some breeds will cost you a bundle before you even get home. Read on to find out which ones.

Border Collie: $600

Border Collies are one of the more beloved dog breeds. Just look at those precious faces! Not only are these dogs adorable, but they’re also smart. Really smart. They’re frequently rated as one of the smartest dog breeds alive today, if not the smartest.

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They’re famously efficient sheepherders, guide dogs, and more. If you’re putting your pup to work, it’s an investment that will cost you somewhere in the realm of six hundred dollars. If you’re just letting them play outdoors with the kids – they’re great with children, as well; this pretty pooch might be a bit on the expensive side.

Puggle: $600

Mixing a beagle with a pug creates a rather desirable cross-breed called a puggle. They’re known to be friendly, silly, playful, and have an odd mixture of adorable and strange-looking. Perfect for someone who just needs a couch companion.

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This newer breed has built up a herd of fans who love it for its energetic and happy nature. If you’re interested in becoming an owner, it will cost you a cool six hundred bucks. While often these dogs are relegated to “designer breed” status, there’s always a chance you could find one at your local adoption agency. They’re reported to be great for new dog owners.

American Akita: $675

If you’re after an adorable puppy that will love you for years to come, consider an American Akita. They have the same lineage as the Japanese Akita, but they’ve been bred with a few more advantages, such as faithfulness and protectiveness.

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Their loud, booming barks might not be fun to listen to while training, but they’re great for scaring away intruders. These are some big dogs, which means you’ll have to put in the time to keep them well-trained, as well as paying out something in the realm of $130 a month for food and maintenance. They also require daily brushing and need lots of exercise.

Cavachon: $730

If you’re after a dog that is perfect as your first pooch, it’s hard to choose better than a Cavachon. They’ve created thanks to breeding a cavalier King Charles spaniel and a bichon frise, and they seem to take all the best qualities of both and combine them in one of the cutest breeds you might ever see.

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They’re known to be devoted to their owners, smart, and friendly with other dogs and kids. They’re even easy to train thanks to wanting to please their owners. They love to spend time with people and adapt to changes well. The one downside is they need a little more grooming than some other breeds.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: $870

Cavalier King Charles spaniels are a versatile breed that will cost you almost a thousand dollars from most breeders. However, for a friendly, four-legged friend, it’s one of the best choices. They get along well with families, dogs, and kids, and they are great in all kinds of environments, from cities to suburbs to rural areas.

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They’re wonderful companion dogs, and every time you see that friendly tail wagging, you’re sure to get a big smile. These dogs are tidy, drool little, and have good general health. A bit pricey, yes, but they’re great for all kinds of people.

Cocker Spaniel $890

A lot of people know the cocker spaniel as a happy dog, and for a good reason. Spaniels of all kids love to be around people, and a cocker spaniel would choose to spend every minute awake with you if they had the choice. You’re going to have to spend an average of about nine hundred dollars for one of these pretty puppies.

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However, a cocker spaniel doesn’t like to be alone, which means if you’re out of the house or apartment for long periods of time, this isn’t the right choice. They also require lots of grooming attention to keep that glossy, curly fur clean. They are, however, easy to train.

Labrador: $890

For a breed with a famously chill temperament, the labrador is at the head of the pack. They’re fantastic in big groups like families, they love kids and treat them well, they play well with other dogs, and they’re gentle with strangers, too.

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For almost a thousand dollars, you can have one of these labs in your color of choice. They love being outdoors, which means if you’re looking for a hiking buddy, you’ve just found it. Potential negatives include not enjoying the apartment life and hating being alone. However, they shed little compared to other dogs and are easy to groom and keep healthy.

Cockapoo: $1,000

These cuties have been becoming more and more popular in recent years. Mixing a cocker spaniel and a poodle creates a cockapoo. One of the biggest reasons for this is they don’t shed like other dogs, meaning they’re practically hypoallergenic – if you or someone in your family is allergic to dogs, this one might just fit the bill.

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They’re also smart, loyal, and sweet with other people. These outgoing dogs love to make friends with creatures of all kinds. A cockapoo puppy will cost you a grand, but they’re easy to train, don’t bark much, and don’t drool. One potential downside is bad general health.

Labradoodle: $1,075

Just like the cockapoo, the labradoodle brings together two famous breeds to create a best-of. Mix a labrador and a poodle, and you’ll have a labradoodle. Known as great family pets, this breed doesn’t shed very much, which means they’re good for apartments and small living spaces.

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Just like the labrador, they’re very friendly with all kinds, but just like the poodle, they’re active dogs (poodles were bred for hunting) which means they need some space to play and run around and require at least daily walks. However, they aren’t bitey, they don’t bark very much, and they don’t drool. These intense dogs will keep you moving.

Kerry Blue Terrier: $1,100

Now there’s a handsome hound. In centuries past, the Kerry blue terrier was prized for its – get this – belligerence. Guard dogs were much more common in the old times, which was why a dog that was ready to bark at anything and everything was something people were interested in. In recent years, kinder traits have been encouraged.

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These dogs were used for hunting as well as guarding, and they’re active, energetic dogs. They also exhibit great loyalty to their family and owner. They aren’t great for multi-dog homes, and they certainly aren’t the dogs for new owners, but they don’t shed much, don’t drool much, and are easy to train.

Great Dane: $1,100

Jinkies! The Great Dane is a big commitment, both physically and financially. These dogs are huge and need lots of space to grow, and you’re going to be getting a pricey bill for all the food they need. Even purchasing a Great Dane is going to run you a pretty high bill, going above a thousand dollars for most pups.

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However, there are plenty of advantages to these huge dogs. They’re incredibly friendly with kids, families, other dogs, and even strangers – while big and a little bit mean-looking, most Great Danes just want to hang out. They have lots of energy and exercise needs if you want to force yourself to get outside. However, they shed and drool a lot and certainly aren’t for new dog owners.

Ibizan Hound: $1,200

With a history going back more than five millennia, the Ibizan hound is a relatively uncommon breed, which is why you might have to shell out more than a thousand dollars to take one home. This breed is famously good-natured, they’re clean and tidy, and a mid-size dog means they fit in most living areas.

 

They’re great for areas that have lots of hot weather but might not be the best choice for cold areas. They don’t bark or howl much, but they’re smart. One thing to know about Ibizan hounds is they like to roam, which means you’ll have to keep them inside, get a big fence, or train them to come home as soon as you call.

Golden Retriever: $1,200

Said to be one of the smartest dog breeds around, golden retrievers are known as one of the happiest and friendliest dog breeds you can add to a family. These dogs have carved out their niche as seeing-eye dogs or guide dogs, which is one of the reasons why purchasing one can cost twelve hundred dollars.

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They’re incredibly friendly with families, kids, and other dogs (I can personally attest to this – my grandmother had several seeing-eyes goldens, and they loved us even more than we loved them). They aren’t prone to wandering off, are one of the easiest breeds to train, and love the feeling of a job well done.

Cavapoo: $1,250

For a dog with an incredibly gentle nature, choose a Cavapoo – a cross between a cavalier King Charles spaniel and a poodle. One of these fluffy little guys is ready to join your family. Whether you have little kids, other dogs, or both, the Cavapoo is ready to have some fun. Thanks to this good-natured attitude, Cavapoos will cost you more than twelve hundred dollars.

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These dogs are also pretty clean, thanks to little shedding and drooling, and they love learning and training. They don’t bark that much and don’t require much exercise. However, they can sometimes be troublesome, so first-time dog owners might want to pick a different breed.

St. Bernard: $1,350

If you’ve ever watched a cartoon that has someone getting stuck in the snow, only to have a big dog bound over and rescue them with a cask of warming liquor, then you’ve seen a St. Bernard. These dogs are intelligent, ready to train, and love to work, which is why they commonly appear as rescue dogs (the liquor is, sadly, just an old wives’ tale).

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However, the initial cost is almost fourteen hundred dollars, and the dogs will grow large: St. Bernards can grow to anywhere from 120 to 180 pounds. That means lots of food and lots of potential health problems. If you’re out in the snow or hunting, they’re great – they’re especially suited for cold weather. They’re also quite friendly and love kids.

Boxer: $1,350

Boxers are the kinds of dogs that really, really want to be lap dogs, but they don’t realize they’re a little bit too big for that. One of these affectionate pooches will cost you around thirteen hundred dollars, but you’ll be getting a loyal dog who will love to give you attention.

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However, they hate to be on their own, which means they’re good for families but might not like single owners. They tend to shed a lot, and they also need lots of exercise. They’re sure to be a hit at the dog part, though watch out – they aren’t the friendliest with other dogs.

Portuguese Water Dog: $1,400

If you’re after a dog that is built for having fun in the water, then a Portuguese water dog is ready to join you. For fourteen hundred dollars, you can have one of these dogs – they come with webbed toes for faster swimming and hypoallergenic hair that not only insulates the dog from cold water but won’t have you sneezing when it’s around.

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They’re also quite friendly, especially with kids and other dogs. They don’t shed or drool; thanks to their high intelligence, they’re quite easy to train. They have lots of energy and can become quite strong, so they’ll need at least one walk a day.

Newfoundland: $1,450

You might remember the kind, sweet Nana, the dog that the Darling children have in their home, from the “Peter Pan” books or movie. This dog was based in Newfoundland, and thanks to their sweet temperament. They’re wonderful with children and enjoy keeping track of their herd – be it sheep or children. These pooches carry some extra weight, and they can get pretty big.

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They also tend to shed lots and drool plenty, so you’ll be cleaning more than you might expect. With a price tag of almost fifteen hundred dollars, they’re pricey but are sure to fit in with your family.

German shepherd: $1,500

These legendary dogs have been military dogs, police K-9 units, and hunting dogs, and that’s because they have all the qualities of tough, trainable working dogs: they’re smart, respond to training, and they love to move, making them some of the strongest and fastest dogs around.

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If you’re willing to shell out one and a half thousand dollars, they also make wonderful companions for regular people, as well. While they don’t mesh well with other dogs, they’re great with kids and families. They don’t drool very much, but they shed a lot. They also need lots of exercise.

Samoyed: $1,500

Nobody could possibly deny that Samoyeds are beautiful dogs, but they come with a high price tag. That’s mostly because of the rarity of the breed, but they’re also dogs that have great personalities – they’re friendly with everything. However, these dogs don’t top the lists of most intelligent dogs and aren’t the easiest to train, either.

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They also tend to shed pretty much year-round. If you’re in a cold-weather area, this is one dog you might want to try out, but certainly not one if you’re in hot-weather areas.

Staffordshire Bull Terrier: $1,500

Once bred to fight other canines, the antagonistic instincts of the Staffordshire bull terrier have been bred out to create a friendly dog. However, they still don’t get along with other dogs too well, so be warned. These pups will cost fifteen hundred out of your wallet, but these sweet dogs are sure to be loyal.

 

They can be brave when they need to be, but they love to be loved. They enjoy being near their friends. They’re also pretty easy to groom, even if they do shed and drool a little bit. They might not be the easiest to train, however, so be wary.

Yorkshire Terrier: $1,500

If you’re after a pup that fits right in a purse, then take a look at the Yorkshire terrier. For the hefty price tag of fifteen hundred dollars, you can get a lap dog that is not only easy to transport but is also relatively friendly to everyone, especially those that it considers in its family.

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While these dogs are in the mid-range of trainable qualities, they make for good first dogs due to their small size, playfulness, and lack of red flags when it comes to qualities. They’re also quite healthy, don’t drool much, and shed less than most other dogs.

Chow Chow: $1,500

You might have had a few smart doggies in your life to this point, but it’s highly unlikely that a Chow Chow was one of them. They’re the dim bulbs of the canine world, but even without smarts, these dogs can be plenty charming. If you’re interested in adding one to your family, you’ll have to fork over fifteen hundred dollars.

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Another issue for these dogs is their temperament – they don’t love kids or other dogs. However, they’re good on their own and aren’t too rambunctious. However, they do tend to have a biting and nipping habit. They might look nice, but they can be nasty!

Rottweiler: $1,550

Thanks to the popularity of these dogs, they will cost you more than fifteen hundred dollars. These dogs have been known as aggressive and dangerous, but they’ve been going through a brand-rebuilding in recent years, with lots of people finding they are great guard dogs but good with kids at the same time.

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They’re intelligent, easy-to-train, and have sweet dispositions, yet they tend to be rambunctious and have lots of energy. They like to bark and howl and can sometimes wander off. Due to this, they aren’t the kind of dog for a first-time owner. If you have the experience, however, a rottweiler might just be the perfect addition to your pack.

Bernese Mountain Dog: $2,000

There are lots of ways to describe Bernese mountain dogs: understanding, sweet, devoted, docile. Shelling out two grand gets you a puppy from a breed that is known for all of these things and more. They’re incredible with kids and families, and you know you’re going to get a picture-perfect pup who will grow up to be a loving and loved addition to any group.

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A lot of people consider these dogs perfect, and we can see why: they’re intelligent and easy to train, they have middle exercise needs, and they’re oh-so cuddly. Potential downsides include a poor health record for the breed, a tendency to bark or howl, and lots and lots and lots of shedding.

Basset Hound: $2,000

It’s kind of incredible that the Alaskan malamute or the Siberian husky and the basset hound are part of the same animal group, but here we are. You likely know the basset hound for its droopy appearance and forlorn look, but don’t be fooled – these incredible creatures have an astonishing sense of smell, and it’s thought to be more than forty times stronger than a human’s.

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It’s why the basset hound has seen so much use as a tracker and hunting dog. You’ll be paying through the nose for this famous sniffer, but you’ll be getting a dog that is incredibly friendly, is simple to keep groomed and clean, and is plenty bright. They love to bark and howl, however, but they aren’t going to do much else. These dogs love to lounge.

Irish Wolfhound: $2,100

You get what you pay for when it comes to the Irish wolfhound. They have an incredible amount of patience, as well as having personalities that nobody could call anything other than sweet and loving. The Irish wolfhound can reach up to over thirty inches tall, which means you’re getting plenty of pup per dollar, though such a big dog might not be for everybody.

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They got their start dragging men off of chariots and warhorses, but these days these tall dogs excel at keeping watch over a family. They’re brave, but not excessively so. For twenty-one hundred dollars, you’re paying a pretty penny for these big dogs, and you’ll have a food bill to match. They also don’t live very long – usually between six and ten years.

Akita Inu: $2,500

The Akita Inu is a loyal, sociable dog. It loves to spend time with the people it knows best, but that means it doesn’t always like to socialize with strangers or other dogs. These dogs were bred to be guard dogs in Japan, and they still exhibit some of those tendencies. They’re thick, dense dogs that have lots of muscle and love to get lots of exercises, so you’d better be ready.

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Due to the handsome appearance and traits of this breed, a normal puppy will cost something like $2,500 for most buyers. Be warned: these aren’t the kind of dogs for novice owners. They tend not to train well.

Doberman Pinscher: $2,500

The Doberman pinscher is thought to be the ultimate guard dog, with the right combination of smarts and strength. Thanks to a resume like that, these dogs don’t come cheap, and at two-and-a-half grand, you’d better be ready to pay big, and not only when you make the purchase, too. While they’re great with the people they like and easy to groom, as well as easy to train, they’re quite playful and need plenty of time outside, which means being cooped up all day will just result in chewed-up couches. Though they were bred to be guard dogs, they don’t bark much and like to stay by the side of their owner or master.

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It’s been said that the Doberman has the best mix of strength and smarts. That’s true, and for this reason, they make excellent guard dogs. But you can probably guess that such an impressive resume doesn’t come cheap. Your Doberman puppy could cost you $2,500, in fact.

Saluki: $3,000

If you’re after a dog that is regal and adventurous, the Saluki might just fit the bill. You’ll be paying through the snout to the tune of three thousand dollars for one of these good-looking dogs, but you’ll be getting a dog that is adapted to Egypt’s hot, arid terrain and has lots of spirit and energy.

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These dogs were bred to chase hunting prey across rocky, sandy areas. They’re intelligent and easy to train, as well as easy to groom. They don’t shed much, don’t drool much, and are good with families and kids. However, they hate being alone, can’t handle living in small areas (they need space to move), and you’d better be ready for long walks.

Cane Corso: $4,000

We’re getting into the pricey pooches now with the Cane Corso, which will cost you four large. These big, muscular dogs had been used all the way back in ancient Rome as guards and protectors. Their name, in fact, is Latin, meaning “bodyguard-dog.”

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They can grow up to 120 pounds, which means your food will be almost as big as the initial purchase. These are not the dogs for first-time owners – they can be surly and aren’t the best kinds of dogs for families and kids. They don’t like to be alone, either. However, they’re easy to groom and intelligent. They do drool, though.

Neapolitan Mastiff: $5,000

As you might have been able to guess, thanks to the name, the Neapolitan mastiff has Roman roots. Just like the Cane Corso, these dogs were bred to be guard dogs and stalwart companions. These are strong dogs, but they also tend to be gentle and faithful. They’re great with the family, though other dogs should be wary.

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They keep things low-key but can also be plenty playful. These massive dogs are great for cuddling on cold nights – because they won’t give you a choice. If you want all of that, you’ll have to lay down some serious cash: about five thousand.

French Bulldog: $6,800

You may wonder why French bulldogs are so expensive – it’s because of the breeding process. The females must be artificially inseminated, and to deliver puppies, it has to be through cesarean sections. Frenchies, as they’re called, are one of the most popular small dogs on the market, which is also why you’ll have to pay almost seven thousand dollars for each one.

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However, these dogs are great for apartments and novice owners. They’re also very affectionate towards almost anything, and the short hair makes them easy to groom. They’re also quite playful, but they don’t need excessive amounts of exercise. However, general health levels are low…

English Bulldog: $6,800

English bulldogs have an odd history. If you’re wondering about the squished face, it’s because they were bred to take part in bull baiting – the short snout helped them get their jaws on a bull’s neck. Many people find bulldogs cute in their own special way.

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Like the French bulldog, the English one also has to give birth via C-section, which is one of the reasons these dogs are so pricey. Yet they have plenty of good characteristics, such as being kid-friendly, good general health, and easy grooming. They do tend to bark a lot and aren’t the easiest to train but are plenty playful.

Afghan Hound: $7,000

Few breeds of dog areas graceful-looking and austere as the Afghan hound. If you want to be an owner of this fancy, fine-haired pooch, you’d better start saving since prices are reaching ten thousand. This beautiful breed will cost a lot, and they’re a mid-sized dog which means a good amount of food, too.

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Afghans are free-thinking and independent – a mature dog might not even enjoy being petted. However, these dogs are tender and can be very affectionate when they want to be. They’re often mischievous, and you might find items of yours, such as clothes, disappearing to secret spots. As you might expect, get ready to groom – fur like that doesn’t just happen.

Pharaoh Hound: $7,500

If you can picture the pharaoh hound lounging in ancient Egyptian palaces, you aren’t alone. Imagine our surprise, then, when we learned that the pharaoh hound hails from Malta, an island in the Mediterranean Sea, and was used to chase rabbits.

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These are athletic companions, but their rarity increases the cost, all the way up to seventy-five hundred dollars. They’re good with kids and other dogs, don’t shed or drool, have great overall health, and are intelligent, too. They might start to bite, and they love hunting things down. Thanks to short, fine hair, they’re great for warm areas. If you live somewhere cold, be sure to get them an adorable little sweater.

Dogo Argentino: $8,000

The Dogo Argentino is a powerful pooch, and if you have your heart set on one, you’ll not only need a big bundle of cash for the down payment, you also can’t live in certain areas of Colorado or anywhere in Norway, just to name a few examples. The Dogo is so strong and dominating that they can be dangerous.

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This is definitely not the dog for first-time owners, as the dog will exert its dominance and could even become violent. They require patience to train, but with enough work, they can fit into a family. They need space, exercise, and lots of food. If you know what you’re doing, this dog will work, but be warned.

Azawakh: $9,000

The Azawakh was only recognized by the American Kennel Club at the start of 2019, which is one of the reasons this dog is so expensive. They’re also recent arrivals in the United States from Western Africa. If you want to get in on the ground floor with one of these dogs, it will cost nine grand.

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These lean, swift hunters have a regal presence. They love the families they’ve gotten to know, but strangers will have them wary. These dogs are quite quiet – not much barking to be done since that can scare prey away. If you’re in a hot area and love to get out and hunt, the Azawakh is a perfect choice since that’s exactly what they want to do, too.

Tibetan Mastiff: $10,000

The Tibetan mastiff is a big, big dog that was originally bred to keep watch over flocks of sheep, but owners started to realize it was a little too expensive to look after. The reason this breed is so expensive is because of the rarity.

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These dogs are great at watching over little ones since they’re very friendly with families and kids but don’t take too kindly to strangers. They’re also great in cold weather, thanks to shaggy, heavy fur. You might be surprised to know the Tibetan doesn’t even shed that much, though it does happen. They’re also intelligent and quite playful. If only they weren’t so darn expensive.

Löwchen: $12,000

Few dogs are more expensive and rarer than the löwchen. This breed only has a few hundred among its number, which is why one of these little dogs will cost you so many thousands. However, if you manage to have the scratch, you’ll be able to get a friendly, sociable dog that likes to stay active and likes to spend time with you.

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While they fit into apartments well, though they do love to bark, their health is good overall, and they’re simple to train. If not for the hefty price tag, this would be the perfect dog for first-time owners.

Canadian Eskimo Dog: $8,750

Here’s a breed that you don’t see a lot anymore, and that’s why they are getting to be so darn expensive. With less than three hundred dogs remaining in this breed, they might be facing extinction. This dog also has a big bundle of health issues, including gastric torsion, entropion, heat intolerance, and arthritis.

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These dogs tend to be very territorial and aren’t very tolerant of small disturbances, meaning they aren’t suitable for families that include children. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police is the reason why this breed is so rare – they killed up to twenty thousand dogs to intentionally disrupt the dog’s way of living once the snowmobile became prominent in the Mounties.

Lakeland Terrier: $2,000

The Lakeland terrier took its name from the Lake District in England and was bred to hunt the foxes that prey on sheep. This dog is hypoallergenic, which means if you suffer thanks to other dogs, this breed might be a good fit. They’re great for families, and you’re sure to fall in love with their interesting character.

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They can be a bit trying to train, but if you do it right, you’ll have no problems. They’re healthy, they don’t drool, and they’re great in lots of different areas, both hot and cold, as well as apartments and rural areas. Plus, they’re adorable. Don’t deny it.

Black Russian Terrier: $3,500

Bred in the USSR by government kennels, the black Russian terrier was made to be military and working dogs. With large bones, big muscles, and action-oriented characteristics, these dogs are ready for action and love to have fun. While they’re often wary of other dogs and strangers, once they get used to kids, they’re great playmates.

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They don’t like to bark very much, and their powerful appearance can make for a good guard dog if you want some extra protection. They need a good bit of grooming to keep their shiny coats healthy and lustrous, and they put everything into their actions. These dogs are intense.

Bedlington Terrier: $4,000

These little guys pack a punch to the wallet, despite their small sizes. Named after the town of Bedlington, Northumberland in North East England, these terriers were bred to hunt vermin, but they’ve shown up in dog racing and other dog sports. You have the chance to find Bedlingtons in blue, liver, or sandy colors, which means you can even match your personal style.

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They’re incredibly friendly, even towards strangers. While they don’t drool very much, they do tend to shed quite a lot. They’re intelligent and easy to train, and love to play. If you have the cash and the kids, they’ll get along great.

Springer Spaniel: $800

Excitable, athletic, versatile, and attractive, springer spaniels were bred to flush out the game for hunters. These popular companions are great hounds for relaxing by the fireside, playing with the kids, and meeting other dogs. However, their nearly boundless energy might be a problem for some people, and these aren’t the kinds of dogs for apartments.

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They love to learn and are easy to train, but they can bite, howl, and will sometimes go off on their own, meaning you’ll have to keep an eye on them if they aren’t kept inside. If you’re an outdoorsman and you want a companion for hunting trips, one of these dogs will be perfect.

Sprollie: $500

While the initial price point of the Sprollie might not shock you, these dogs can end up costing you quite a lot, thanks to grooming appointments, doctor visits, and more. Sprollies are a cross between an English springer spaniel and a collie, and their energy levels are unmatched when it comes to dog breeds.

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Don’t be surprised if you find yourself walking more than ten miles a week in order for this pup to burn off all the energy. They’re bright and loving, and they can range from obedient and sweet to crazy, destructive, and moody. While these dogs can be a handful, they’re sure to be fun.

Rhodesian Ridgeback: $3,000

The Rhodesian ridgeback got its distinctive stripe of hair, the nominal ridge, thanks to breeding that includes wild African dogs. While these dogs can prove to be aloof with strangers and very protective of their property, they tend to love their immediate family and are good with kids. They do shed a lot but are relatively easy to groom.

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They need a lot of exercises and can be very playful. They don’t bark much, and while they were bred to hunt lions, they’re more likely to relax next to you on the couch after your jog. Meet the needs of this sometimes-troublesome bred, and you’ll have a lifelong companion.

Beagle: $800

As one of the most popular breeds in the United States, you’ll be able to get one of these dogs for a relatively low price. You’ll know you’re near a beagle due to its propensity to bark. They’re also likely to come up and say high, even if you’re a stranger. While they’re prone to wander away from owners, they hate being alone for too long.

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Beagles are full of energy and love to play, which means you’re going to soon be a fixture at the local dog park. They don’t drool much, but their biggest issue is that they can be notoriously difficult to train. Finally, they also have notably bad health issues due to their breed’s stock.

Shetland Sheepdog: $3,000

Shelties, as this breed is often called, are adorable miniature collies employed to herd sheep, ponies, and even poultry. They were bred smaller than their cousins in order to reduce how much they have to eat. They’re affectionate and kind – herding dogs love to keep watch over small creatures, be they animals or grandchildren.

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These dogs come packed full of fur, and while they aren’t that hard to keep groomed, they’re going to be constantly shedding. They like to bark, need lots of exercises, and don’t like to be on their own, but they’re intelligent, easy to train, don’t drool much, and are great in cold-weather areas.