5 Reasons to Refrain From Making Wild Animals Your Pets

What happens when you’re walking in the woods or the park, and you come across what seems to be an abandoned bunny or baby squirrel? Would you consider taking it home and raising it as a pet? Everybody knows someone who has told stories of keeping a wild animal as a pet. But wild animals are not pets, and they should not be treated as though they are. If you think a baby animal is in danger, call a local wildlife center to ask for information and guidance. You won’t be doing anyone any favors by bringing it into your house. Here are five reasons why you shouldn’t try and raise a wild animal at home.
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Shutterstock

1. Growing Up

We admit it; baby animals are hard to resist. It’s something about their eyes that make them appear as though they are dependent upon us for their survival. But even the cutest little animals grow, and their instincts begin to kick in. They may scratch, bite, and even display a force that may be hard for you to fight physically. That’s usually when people release them back into the wild, which may seem harmless, but it’s not. The animal that has been “domesticated” may not have developed the critical skills to survive out in the wild.

2. It’s Illegal

From monkeys to bunnies, it’s against the law to attempt at raising and type of wild animal in captivity. So if for no other reason than to keep yourself out of trouble, leave the wild animals in the wild.

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Shutterstock

3. Domestication?

Domestication is a process that takes ages to complete. Though it may seem obvious to us by now, the truth of the matter is that dogs and cats have been bred as home animals for thousands of years. You can take the animal out of the wild, but it’ll be a heck of a lot harder to take the wild out of the animal.

4. Diseases

News flash! Many wild animals, skunks, and raccoons, to name a few, can carry rabies without showing any symptoms. In addition to this, tens of thousands of humans get salmonella infections from amphibians and reptiles yearly. Bringing that into your home endangers your whole family to a slew of diseases.

5. They May Not Need Your Help

Though it may be heartbreaking seeing an animal alone in the wilderness, they may not need rescuing. Some animal mothers stay away from their babies during the day to reduce drawing attention to them. They usually check on them and feed them at night. So try leaving mother nature’s job up to mother nature, and if you feel as though the animal may be in danger, call the nearest wildlife center! They probably have all the right answers!